Published Papers - Abstract 602

Aljadani H, Sibbritt D, Patterson A & Collins C. Diet quality does not predict six-year weight changes in mid-age women from Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. , 2012; : 6(Supp1)27

Aim: To examine the relationship between diet quality and six year weight change in the mid-age cohort from the Australian longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH).Method: 8815 women followed up from 2001 to 2007. Diet quality was assessed by the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS), derived from the Dietary Questionnaire for Epidemiological Studies. Absolute weight change was the main outcome. Subjects with any of the following conditions were excluded: diabetes, stroke, heart disease or/and cancer. Linear regression was used to test the relationship between diet quality and changes in body weight applying for three different models. Further regression analyses were applied to assess potential relations between sub-scales of ARFS and weight change during six years.Results: On average, women gained weight during follow-up (mean (SD) weight change 1.6 (6.2) kg). Diet quality (mean (SD) 32.6 (8.7) score) was not optimal. There was no association between ARFS and weight change during follow-up (p = 0.078; coefficient: 0.016) adjusted for total energy intake, education, area of resident, baseline weight, physical activity, smoking and menopause status. However, there was a significant association between the animal protein sub-scale and weight gain (p = 0.005; coefficient: 0.138), adjusted for total energy intake, education, area of resident, weight, physical activity, smoking and menopause status. The plant protein sub-scale had a non-significant association with weight loss, p = 0.98; coefficient: -0.002.Conclusion: Higher diet quality, as measured by the Australian Recommended Food Score was not associated with weight change. Although a higher score of animal protein subscale contributed to gain 138 g during six years.

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