Published Papers - Abstract 1020

Wilson LF, Pandeya N, Byles J & Mishra GD. Hysterectomy status and all-cause mortality in a 21 year Australian population-based cohort study. American Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2019; 220(1): 83.e1-83.e

Background: Hysterectomy is a common surgical procedure, predominantly performed when women are between 30 and 50 years old. One in 3 women in Australia has had a hysterectomy by the time they are 60 years old, and 30% have both ovaries removed at the time of surgery. Given this high prevalence, it is important to understand the long-term effects of hysterectomy. In particular, women who have a hysterectomy/oophorectomy at younger ages are likely to be premenopausal or perimenopausal and may experience greater changes in hormone levels and a shortened reproductive lifespan than women who have a hysterectomy when they are older and postmenopausal. Use of menopausal hormone therapy after surgery may compensate for these hormonal changes. To inform clinical decisions about postsurgery management of women who have a hysterectomy prior to menopause (ie, average age at menopause 50 years), it is useful to compare women with a hysterectomy to women with no hysterectomy and to stratify the hysterectomy status by whether or not women have had a bilateral oophorectomy, or used menopausal hormone therapy.Objective: We sought to investigate whether women who had a hysterectomy with ovarian conservation or a hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy before the age of 50 years were at a higher risk of premature all-cause mortality compared to women who did not have this surgery before the age of 50 years. We also sought to explore whether use of menopausal hormone therapy modified these associations.Study Design: Women from the midcohort (born 1946 through 1951) of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health were included in our study sample (n = 13,541). Women who reported a hysterectomy (with and without both ovaries removed) before the age of 50 years were considered exposure at risk and compared with women who did not report these surgeries before age 50 years. To explore effect modification by use of menopausal hormone therapy we further stratified hysterectomy status by menopausal hormone therapy use. Risk of all-cause mortality was assessed using inverse-probability weighted Cox regression models.Results: During a median follow-up of 21.5 years, there were 901 (6.7%) deaths in our study sample. Overall, there was no difference in all-cause mortality between women who reported a hysterectomy with ovarian conservation (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–1.02) or women who reported a hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.78–1.34) and women with no hysterectomy. When stratified by menopausal hormone therapy use, women with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation before the age of 50 years were not at higher risk of all-cause mortality compared to no hysterectomy, regardless of menopausal hormone therapy use status. In contrast, among nonusers of menopausal hormone therapy only, women who reported a hysterectomy-bilateral oophorectomy before the age of 50 years were at a higher risk of death compared to women with no hysterectomy (hazard ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–3.25).ConclusionHysterectomy with ovarian conservation before the age of 50 years did not increase risk of all-cause mortality. Among nonmenopausal hormone therapy users only, hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy before the age of 50 years was associated with a higher risk of death. Previous article in issue

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