Published Papers - Abstract 622

Clark B, Peeters G, Gomersall S, Pavey T & Brown W. Nine year changes in sitting time in young and mid-aged Australian women: Findings from the Australian Longitudinal study for Women's Health. Preventive Medicine, 2014; 64: 2017-7-1 0

Objective: To examine changes in sitting time (ST) in women over nine years and to identify associationsbetween life events and these changes.Methods. Young (born 1973–78, n = 5215) and mid-aged (born 1946–51, n = 6973) women reported life events and ST in four surveys of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health between 2000 and 2010. Associations between life events and changes in ST between surveys Results. Against a background of complex changes there was an overall decrease in ST in young women (median change -0.48 h/day, interquartile range [IQR] = -2.54, 1.50) and an increase in ST in mid-aged women (median change 0.43 h/day; IQR = -1.29, 2.0) over nine years. In young women, returning to study and job loss were associated with increased ST, while having a baby, beginning work and decreased income were associated with decreased ST. In mid-aged women, changes at work were associated with increased ST, while retiring and decreased income were associated with decreased ST.Conclusions. ST changed over nine years in young and mid-aged Australian women. The life events they experienced, particularly events related to work and family, were associated with these changes.

Return