Title, Synopsis and Publications Investigators and Collaborators
Social patterning in weight trajectories in relation to pregnancy event
Analysis 1: Investigation into the social patterning of body weight trajectory over 13 years among the ALSWH 'young' women (born 1973-1978) has been completed. Highest achieved education was inversely associated with body weight trajectory; women with a low or intermediate education weighed more at baseline and gained more weight over the 13 year period, compared to high educated women. Interestingly, we also found that women with the greatest mobility (from early to mid-twenties, to early to mid-thirties) had a similarly favourable baseline weight and weight trajectory to the women who had already achieved this high education at baseline. These findings highlight the importance of when education is measured and the need to consider early life factors and personality traits/characteristics which may influence both education and weight outcomes. Analysis 2: Preliminary analysis has been completed looking at the social patterning of reproduction among these ALSWH 'young' women. While 28% of women in the cohort had no children, over half of the women had two or more children. The mean age at birth of the first child was 28.8 years, with approximately half of the women having a high education. Approximately 4 out of 5 women had not experienced fertility issues (partner or self). Number of children: Lower educated women were more likely to have children (especially 3 or more) than high educated women. Women living in rural and remote areas were more likley to have 2, or 3 or more children, compared to women living in urban areas. Compared to Australian born women, women born in Asia were less likely to have 3 or more children, while women born in 'other countries, including the Middle East' were more likely to have 3 or more children. Age at birth of first child: Women with a lower education were 3.5-4.5 more likely than high educated women to give birth for the first time below the age of 26 years. Women living in rural areas were also more likely to give birth for the first time below the age of 26 years, compared to women living in urban areas. Interval between children: The WHO recommends and birth to pregnancy (BTP) interval of 18-27 months after a live birth. Compared to women with an ijnterval between child 1 and 2 within this recommendation, lower educated women were more likely than high educated women to have a longer than recommended birth interval - this is probably due to higher educated women having their first birth at an older age and thus needing to have shorter intervals if they wish to have more than one child. Women with a BTP interval between child 1 and 2 of greater than 59 months were more likely to find it sometimes or always difficult to manage on their income. Breastfeeding: The WHO recommends at least 6 months of breastfeeding for each child. Compared to women who met this recommendation for all their children, women with a low or intermediate education were2.7 and 2.4 times more likely, respectively, than high educated women to not meet these guidelines. Also, w2omen born in Asia were more likely than Australian born women to not meet these guidelines. Women löiving in in rural areas appeared somewhat more likely to meet the guidelines for breastfeeding all children, compared to women living in urban areas. Analysis 3: Social patterning of bosy weight trajectory in relation to reproduction - analysis has not yet begun.
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Prof Gita Mishra
Dr Natalie Holowko
Prof Ilona Koupil
A/Prof Leigh Tooth
Dr Mark Jones